Student Performance Profile

 

Proven Academic Performance across Several Criteria

How do Western New York Catholic schools measure effectiveness in teaching? In part, through state-administered tests that evaluate students' competence in such core courses as mathematics and language arts. The comparative scores of third- through eighth-grade students illustrate clearly the margin of difference between public and parochial schools. In Catholic schools in the Diocese of Buffalo, 48.3% of students who took the 2016 New York State 3-8 assessments were proficient in language arts, as compared to 34.3% in the BOCES system and 39.8% statewide.  In math, 40.3% of Catholic school students cored at the proficiency level or above, as compared to 35.2% in the BOCES system and 39.8% statewide..

But test scores are only one indication of academic excellence. Catholic schools foster curiosity, creativity, and a general love of education that remains with students all their lives. Our schools bring fun and excitement to learning through Quiz Bowl competitions, science and history fairs, essay competitions, and other academically-based programs:

  • St. Christopher School, Tonawanda, won both first and second place in the regional Science Bowl competition. The first place win enabled that team to travel to Denver, Colorado, to participate in a challenge against schools from around the country.
  • Immaculate Conception School, Wellsville, took World Honors in Odyssey of the Mind Competition by winning first place out of 53 teams from Poland, China, Singapore, Hong Kong, Japan and the U.S.
  • At St. John the Baptist School, Alden, students performed "One Small Child" at their annual Christmas performance. Every child from Pre-K through grade 8 participated in singing the spirit-filled music.

A Caring, Structured Learning Environment

Our students' success reflects the work of competent, dedicated teachers and an atmosphere that stresses discipline in both behavior and study habits:

  • Michael, an honor-roll student at DeSales Catholic in Lockport, says it's easier to learn when there is order in the classroom: "Everyone has such respect for everyone else that we're all on our best behavior. It's expected. We learn it from day one."
  • Rebecca, a student at St. John the Baptist in Kenmore, appreciates the fact that classes are small, and teachers "concentrate on your special abilities. They push you to (be your best)."

Preparing Students for a Brighter Future

The value of early discipline and an exposure to challenging areas of study are evident when our students go on to further achievement in high school and college, many with scholarships and other honors. Their paths to success can be traced to their Catholic elementary schools:

  • 99% of Catholic high school students graduate.
  • 98% of Catholic high school graduates go on to college.
  • 94% of Catholic elementary school eighth-grade students are accepted to their first choice of high schools.
  • In recent years, Catholic high school graduates received collegiate scholarships totaling in excess of $157 million.

 

Student Performance Profile

 

Proven Academic Performance across Several Criteria

How do Western New York Catholic schools measure effectiveness in teaching? In part, through state-administered tests that evaluate students' competence in such core courses as mathematics and language arts. The comparative scores of third- through eighth-grade students illustrate clearly the margin of difference between public and parochial schools. In Catholic schools in the Diocese of Buffalo, 48.3% of students who took the 2016 New York State 3-8 assessments were proficient in language arts, as compared to 34.3% in the BOCES system and 39.8% statewide.  In math, 40.3% of Catholic school students cored at the proficiency level or above, as compared to 35.2% in the BOCES system and 39.8% statewide..

But test scores are only one indication of academic excellence. Catholic schools foster curiosity, creativity, and a general love of education that remains with students all their lives. Our schools bring fun and excitement to learning through Quiz Bowl competitions, science and history fairs, essay competitions, and other academically-based programs:

  • St. Christopher School, Tonawanda, won both first and second place in the regional Science Bowl competition. The first place win enabled that team to travel to Denver, Colorado, to participate in a challenge against schools from around the country.
  • Immaculate Conception School, Wellsville, took World Honors in Odyssey of the Mind Competition by winning first place out of 53 teams from Poland, China, Singapore, Hong Kong, Japan and the U.S.
  • At St. John the Baptist School, Alden, students performed "One Small Child" at their annual Christmas performance. Every child from Pre-K through grade 8 participated in singing the spirit-filled music.

A Caring, Structured Learning Environment

Our students' success reflects the work of competent, dedicated teachers and an atmosphere that stresses discipline in both behavior and study habits:

  • Michael, an honor-roll student at DeSales Catholic in Lockport, says it's easier to learn when there is order in the classroom: "Everyone has such respect for everyone else that we're all on our best behavior. It's expected. We learn it from day one."
  • Rebecca, a student at St. John the Baptist in Kenmore, appreciates the fact that classes are small, and teachers "concentrate on your special abilities. They push you to (be your best)."

Preparing Students for a Brighter Future

The value of early discipline and an exposure to challenging areas of study are evident when our students go on to further achievement in high school and college, many with scholarships and other honors. Their paths to success can be traced to their Catholic elementary schools:

  • 99% of Catholic high school students graduate.
  • 98% of Catholic high school graduates go on to college.
  • 94% of Catholic elementary school eighth-grade students are accepted to their first choice of high schools.
  • In recent years, Catholic high school graduates received collegiate scholarships totaling in excess of $157 million.