Summer Reading Review Tips

Sep. 3rd, 2015 1:58 pm

So summer is over and your child is returning to school. Reading is a vital part of preparation for the new school year, but what if your son or daughter read their assigned summer reading early in the summer? What if they read more than just what was assigned?

Regardless of when your child completed their required reading, it is a great idea to help them review the assigned books they read. Here are a few ways you can get your child to submit a "book report" without assigning them work before the first day.

First off, find out which books they read for the assigned summer reading. Ask them, if they can't remember, (hopefully from reading too much) then do your research. Once you've determined the books read, start out by asking simple questions about their opinion of the book. This will get them thinking about the book and whether they liked it or not.

They liked it.

Find out what they liked.  Was it the story? The characters? Who was their favorite character? What types of traits did their favorite character possess that made them the favorite? Did they like the way the author wrote? Does the author have other books?

Ask what was their favorite part of the story. Was it the beginning? Was it when the prince kissed the princess? Was it when they finally solved the mystery? Was it the battle? Have them describe this favorite part of the story, and show how interested you are in hearing about it.

The more the child liked the book, odds are the more you will be able to hear about it. So what if they didn't like it?

They didn't like it.

What was the main reason they didn't like the book? Expect "Because it was boring," but don't give up there. You can still ask them who their favorite character? What was their favorite part of the story? Focus on what they did like about the book. They might surprise themselves with how much they actually cared about the book they said they didn't like.

Another strategy to help with children who didn't like their summer reading book is to have them tell you, or write down an alternate ending. How would they have ended the story? What would they do differently if they were the author? Putting them in the writer's chair will allow them to review what happened in the story in depth, even if they are rewriting the whole thing their way.

You can also have your child draw a picture of their favorite character or scene from the stories. This will help with younger kids who don't have the best writing skills. Have them tell you the story, kids love to tell stories. Ask them if they learned any new words, or lessons from the book.

Asking questions and having your student tell you about the stories is a great way to refresh their memory about the summer reading they completed, Don't forget to tell them how proud you are of them for finishing their reading!


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Summer Reading Review Tips

Sep. 3rd, 2015 1:58 pm

So summer is over and your child is returning to school. Reading is a vital part of preparation for the new school year, but what if your son or daughter read their assigned summer reading early in the summer? What if they read more than just what was assigned?

Regardless of when your child completed their required reading, it is a great idea to help them review the assigned books they read. Here are a few ways you can get your child to submit a "book report" without assigning them work before the first day.

First off, find out which books they read for the assigned summer reading. Ask them, if they can't remember, (hopefully from reading too much) then do your research. Once you've determined the books read, start out by asking simple questions about their opinion of the book. This will get them thinking about the book and whether they liked it or not.

They liked it.

Find out what they liked.  Was it the story? The characters? Who was their favorite character? What types of traits did their favorite character possess that made them the favorite? Did they like the way the author wrote? Does the author have other books?

Ask what was their favorite part of the story. Was it the beginning? Was it when the prince kissed the princess? Was it when they finally solved the mystery? Was it the battle? Have them describe this favorite part of the story, and show how interested you are in hearing about it.

The more the child liked the book, odds are the more you will be able to hear about it. So what if they didn't like it?

They didn't like it.

What was the main reason they didn't like the book? Expect "Because it was boring," but don't give up there. You can still ask them who their favorite character? What was their favorite part of the story? Focus on what they did like about the book. They might surprise themselves with how much they actually cared about the book they said they didn't like.

Another strategy to help with children who didn't like their summer reading book is to have them tell you, or write down an alternate ending. How would they have ended the story? What would they do differently if they were the author? Putting them in the writer's chair will allow them to review what happened in the story in depth, even if they are rewriting the whole thing their way.

You can also have your child draw a picture of their favorite character or scene from the stories. This will help with younger kids who don't have the best writing skills. Have them tell you the story, kids love to tell stories. Ask them if they learned any new words, or lessons from the book.

Asking questions and having your student tell you about the stories is a great way to refresh their memory about the summer reading they completed, Don't forget to tell them how proud you are of them for finishing their reading!


comments powered by Disqus