Spring Is In the Air With Easter Traditions on Deck

Apr. 13th, 2017 2:30 pm

It's officially spring, and that means Easter is right around the corner!  While flowers are often used with different holidays, they're definitely associated with Easter, with lilies used as popular symbols of the holiday and season representing hope and love.  Even more so, white lilies represent specific symbolism, signifying resurrection and purity.  But Easter lilies aren't the only symbolism that's associated with Easter.

Traditionally, Easter is a celebration of the resurrection of Christ, and represents the most important Christian holiday.  Though many people associate the day with creative and brightly colored eggs, hidden from children by a small bunny, the bunny and the treats it brings may not seem like they have anything to do with Christianity or the observance of the holiday, but take a closer look you'll find the connection.

The term "Easter" actually comes from "Eastre," the Anglo-Saxon goddess who symbolizes the hare and the egg, and the gifting of eggs during Easter dates back to before the holiday.  Exchanging eggs is considered symbolism for rebirth -- right in line with the day's theme.  Today, the holiday is associated with a myriad of traditions and symbolism, including Easter egg hunts and chocolate bunnies.  But there is some interesting history behind those eggs you may not know. 

A Bunny that Lays Eggs?

That popular bunny that leaves tasty treats in the basket actually comes from the Anglo-Saxon festival of Eastre, in which a spring goddess used a rabbit as a symbol of fertility.  The eggs came into the picture when Germans settled in Pennsylvania in the 1700s when the tradition of a bunny laying eggs was born.

Decorating Eggs, a Ukrainian Tradition

Ukrainian immigrants brought their fancily decorated eggs to America, called pysankas, which were made and decorated with wax and dyes.

Hopefully you've learned a bit about those special traditions that come along with Easter.  It's a special season that culminates with celebrating Christ's resurrection, but there are so many things to enjoy about the season.  We wish everyone a great Easter season full of love, family experiences and maybe even a couple chocolate eggs along the way!

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Spring Is In the Air With Easter Traditions on Deck

Apr. 13th, 2017 2:30 pm

It's officially spring, and that means Easter is right around the corner!  While flowers are often used with different holidays, they're definitely associated with Easter, with lilies used as popular symbols of the holiday and season representing hope and love.  Even more so, white lilies represent specific symbolism, signifying resurrection and purity.  But Easter lilies aren't the only symbolism that's associated with Easter.

Traditionally, Easter is a celebration of the resurrection of Christ, and represents the most important Christian holiday.  Though many people associate the day with creative and brightly colored eggs, hidden from children by a small bunny, the bunny and the treats it brings may not seem like they have anything to do with Christianity or the observance of the holiday, but take a closer look you'll find the connection.

The term "Easter" actually comes from "Eastre," the Anglo-Saxon goddess who symbolizes the hare and the egg, and the gifting of eggs during Easter dates back to before the holiday.  Exchanging eggs is considered symbolism for rebirth -- right in line with the day's theme.  Today, the holiday is associated with a myriad of traditions and symbolism, including Easter egg hunts and chocolate bunnies.  But there is some interesting history behind those eggs you may not know. 

A Bunny that Lays Eggs?

That popular bunny that leaves tasty treats in the basket actually comes from the Anglo-Saxon festival of Eastre, in which a spring goddess used a rabbit as a symbol of fertility.  The eggs came into the picture when Germans settled in Pennsylvania in the 1700s when the tradition of a bunny laying eggs was born.

Decorating Eggs, a Ukrainian Tradition

Ukrainian immigrants brought their fancily decorated eggs to America, called pysankas, which were made and decorated with wax and dyes.

Hopefully you've learned a bit about those special traditions that come along with Easter.  It's a special season that culminates with celebrating Christ's resurrection, but there are so many things to enjoy about the season.  We wish everyone a great Easter season full of love, family experiences and maybe even a couple chocolate eggs along the way!

comments powered by Disqus