How to Teach Real Easter Values, With Bunny Ears

Mar. 24th, 2016 11:45 am
Images of the Easter bunny, baskets, eggs and chocolate are common symbols of Easter; less often do we see symbols of Jesus, the cross, or the tomb from which He emerged. Here are a few little tips on how to use common images as tools to focus the meaning of Easter back to its original meaning. .
 

Use the Image of the Easter Bunny Symbolically

Whether you use a picture, stuffed animal, or just their imagination, the characteristics of the Easter bunny can be used to describe the values Jesus represented. Here are a few examples:
 
The Real Easter bunny is...
 
White, because Jesus takes all sin away
Gentle, kind-hearted and forgiving, just like Jesus
Has big ears, that are quick to listen; Jesus will always listen to our prayers
Has big eyes, to help us look carefully and choose what is good
 

Decorate Eggs With a Twist

As we mentioned in our last post about "Eggcellent" Easter egg hunt tips, you can use the Easter egg tradition to help talk about the story.
 
One idea would be simply using a crayon to write each child's favorite attribute of Jesus. (Help them out with choices like loving, forgiving, etc.) This gives you a chance to talk about Easter while decorating.
 
Another could be using the same types of attributes on the eggs used for the hunt, so that the kids will discover these wonderful things in addition to having fun.
 
For older Catholic elementary students, you can have a contest that coincides with the egg hunt. Among all the eggs, inside a few of the eggs, write a small part of the Easter story. At the end, whoever can unscramble the "story" eggs into the right order wins a special prize.
 

Read a Children's Book About Easter

Regardless of how old your Catholic school students are, simply reading a children's book about the story of Easter together can be fun and informative. Here are a few examples of fun children's books that help kids understand the real meaning of Easter.
 
Age 2-5 "What is Easter" by Michelle Medlock Adams
Age 4-7 "The Berenstain Bears and the Easter Story" by Mike Berenstain
Age 7-12 "The Story of Easter" by Aileen Fisher
 
We hope these tips helped show how easy it is to bring the focus of Easter back to its real meaning while having fun. Do you have any ideas or traditions that you use with your family? We'd love to hear them! Stay tuned to the WNY Catholic schools' blog for more fun and interesting ideas for families of some of the best private schools in Western New York!
 
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How to Teach Real Easter Values, With Bunny Ears

Mar. 24th, 2016 11:45 am
Images of the Easter bunny, baskets, eggs and chocolate are common symbols of Easter; less often do we see symbols of Jesus, the cross, or the tomb from which He emerged. Here are a few little tips on how to use common images as tools to focus the meaning of Easter back to its original meaning. .
 

Use the Image of the Easter Bunny Symbolically

Whether you use a picture, stuffed animal, or just their imagination, the characteristics of the Easter bunny can be used to describe the values Jesus represented. Here are a few examples:
 
The Real Easter bunny is...
 
White, because Jesus takes all sin away
Gentle, kind-hearted and forgiving, just like Jesus
Has big ears, that are quick to listen; Jesus will always listen to our prayers
Has big eyes, to help us look carefully and choose what is good
 

Decorate Eggs With a Twist

As we mentioned in our last post about "Eggcellent" Easter egg hunt tips, you can use the Easter egg tradition to help talk about the story.
 
One idea would be simply using a crayon to write each child's favorite attribute of Jesus. (Help them out with choices like loving, forgiving, etc.) This gives you a chance to talk about Easter while decorating.
 
Another could be using the same types of attributes on the eggs used for the hunt, so that the kids will discover these wonderful things in addition to having fun.
 
For older Catholic elementary students, you can have a contest that coincides with the egg hunt. Among all the eggs, inside a few of the eggs, write a small part of the Easter story. At the end, whoever can unscramble the "story" eggs into the right order wins a special prize.
 

Read a Children's Book About Easter

Regardless of how old your Catholic school students are, simply reading a children's book about the story of Easter together can be fun and informative. Here are a few examples of fun children's books that help kids understand the real meaning of Easter.
 
Age 2-5 "What is Easter" by Michelle Medlock Adams
Age 4-7 "The Berenstain Bears and the Easter Story" by Mike Berenstain
Age 7-12 "The Story of Easter" by Aileen Fisher
 
We hope these tips helped show how easy it is to bring the focus of Easter back to its real meaning while having fun. Do you have any ideas or traditions that you use with your family? We'd love to hear them! Stay tuned to the WNY Catholic schools' blog for more fun and interesting ideas for families of some of the best private schools in Western New York!
 
comments powered by Disqus